The National Archives Displays the “Fifth Page” of the U.S. Constitution for the First Time Sept. 14-19





Washington, DC. . . As part of the celebration of the document’s 225th anniversary, the National Archives will for the first time exhibit the so-called “Fifth Page” of the Constitution of the United States.  It will be on display from Friday, September 14, through Wednesday, September 19, 2012, in the East Rotunda Gallery in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.  Museum hours are 10 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. daily, but the museum will open late at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, September 17 (Constitution Day).

The fifth page is also known as the transmittal page of the Constitution and the Resolutions of the Constitutional Convention. This document, signed by George Washington, who presided over the Constitutional Convention, describes how the Constitution was to be ratified and put into effect.

An Inside the Vaults video short, “US Constitution – ‘The Fifth Page’ (Transmittal Page),” discusses the conservation treatment and re-encasement of the document.  Chief of the Preservation Laboratory MaryLynn Ritzenthaler and Supervisory Conservator Kitty Nicholson recount their role in the project.  The 3:35 minute video is part of the ongoing “Inside the Vaults”series and can be viewed on the National Archives YouTube channel:  http://tiny.cc/FifthPage.

The other four pages of the Constitution are on permanent display in the Rotunda, along with the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights.  Together they are known as the Charters of Freedom.  Early in the last decade, all seven pages – including the transmittal page – were placed in new, state-of-the-art encasements after undergoing conservation treatment. The National Archives Building is located just off the National Mall at Constitution Avenue and 7th Street, NW. Metro accessible on the Yellow and Green lines, Archives/Navy Memorial/Penn Quarter station.

Background on “Inside the Vaults”
“Inside the Vaults” is part of the ongoing effort by the National Archives to make its collections, stories, and accomplishments more accessible to the public. “Inside the Vaults” gives voice to Archives staff and users, highlights new and exciting finds at the Archives, and reports on complicated and technical subjects in easily understandable presentations.  Earlier topics include the conservation of the original Declaration of Independence, and the 1297 Magna Carta, the transfer to the National Archives of the Nuremberg Laws, and the 100th Anniversary of the Titanic disaster.  The film series is free to view and distribute on our YouTube channel at http://tiny.cc/Vaults

Created by a former broadcast network news producer, the "Inside the Vaults" video shorts series presents “behind the scenes” exclusives and offer surprising glimpses of the National Archives treasures.  These videos are in the public domain and not subject to any copyright restrictions.  The National Archives encourages the free distribution of them.



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