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News at Home


  • A House Still Divided (Part 1)

    by Walter G. Moss

    The core of our polarization is a disagreement about what kind of country we will be – one dominated by Christian white men or one, in Frederick Douglass's words, "of perfect civil equality to the people of all races and of all creeds, and to men of no creeds." 


  • The Roots of the Politicization of the National Parks Service

    by Nick DeLuca

    The National Park Service has never been totally independent of politics. But a 1996 law requiring Senate approval of the NPS Director, combined with the Trump administration's use of acting directors, has created uncertainty. Approving Biden's nominee Chuck Sams is a key step to putting the National Parks on solid footing. 


  • See a Piece of History: Retired FDNY Fireboat John D. McKean

    The Fireboat McKean Preservation Project and the Hudson River Parks Friends offer those in New York the opportunity to visit the McKean at Pier 25 in lower Manhattan. The McKean's half-century of service most notably included evacuation and firefighting support on 9/11. 


  • 9/11's Memorials and the Politics of Historical Memory

    by Marita Sturken

    Major 9/11 memorials try to fix the public memory on a moment of national unity that, 20 years later, seems illusory. Other memorials point the way to using the force of memory to encourage critical reflection on nationalism.


  • Teaching "All Men are Created Equal" (Part II)

    by Jeff Schneider

    In the second part of this essay, a longtime teacher of American history maintains that a close reading of the Declaration of Independence makes it possible to discuss revolution and racism in a thoughtful way without intimidating either white students or students of color.


  • Teaching "All Men are Created Equal" (Part I)

    by Jeff Schneider

    A longtime teacher of American history maintains that a close reading of the Declaration of Independence makes it possible to discuss revolution and racism in a thoughtful way without intimidating either white students or students of color.


  • Were the 9/11 Attacks Preventable?

    by J. Samuel Walker

    It's impossible to know if more diligent preparation for potential Al Qaeda attacks could have prevented them, but the Bush administration's slowness to develop a national security strategy for terrorism will always haunt the nation and the world. 


  • Critical Theory Opposes the Right Wing's Cancel Politics

    by Leah Allen and Pipa Marguerite

    Before Critical Race Theory, the Frankfurt School of social criticism was a preferred target of the right. Ironically, it is the right that has been most agressively and systematically moving to "cancel" ideas it opposes, and the Frankfurt School that shows how to resist. 


  • Comparing Trump to Hitler is a Wrongheaded Distraction

    by Claudia Koonz

    The comparison indulges liberal distaste for Trump, but it obscures the degree to which, absent any coherent policy of national rebuilding, Trumpism is hitched even more closely to racial nationalism than Nazism was.


  • A Brief History of the "Isolationist" Strawman

    by Brandan P. Buck

    As the United States enters another round of agonizing soul searching after another lost war, Americans should learn the fraught political history of the "isolationist" label.


  • Words of Warning: Many Opposed the Afghanistan Invasion in 2001

    by John Bodnar

    "Today Americans worry over the humanitarian crisis at the Kabul airport.  But they mostly forget the one that transpired over a period of two decades and led to the death of some 150,000 Afghans in a war to eliminate evil from the world."


  • The View from the New York City Hiroshima Peace Vigil

    by Michael McQuillan

    The march featured the testimony of antinuclear activists and rekindled a demand for New York's city council to divest the city budget from contractors who make nuclear weapons, but too much of the public seems willing to ignore the nuclear threat.