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News at Home


  • Gil Coronado: The Padrino of National Hispanic Month

    by Ricardo Romo

    After dropping out of high school to begin his Air Force career at age 15, Gil Coronado became the most influential leader in expanding the federal recognition of Hispanic heritage from a week to a month. 


  • Arena Rockin' The Vote?

    by George Case

    Dismissed, derided, or even deplored by critics, and out of step with the trends, arena rock acts still pack them in in much of America. Is it the sonic key to understanding Trumpism? 


  • Pessimistic Economic Forecasts Ignore a History of Dynamism

    by John Landry and Howard Wolk

    Many economic histories portray the American prosperity of the century between the Civil War and the 1970s as the picking of low-hanging fruit. But the story of entrepreneurial innovation during that time is more complicated, and more relevant to the present, than we think. 


  • The Authoritarian Personality and the Rising Far Right

    by Sam Ben-Meir

    This moment of peril for American democracy calls for a return to the diagnosis presented in "The Authoritarian Personality," 1950s effort to develop a social-psychological profile of the people likely to embrace fascism. 


  • UN Report Highlights Ongoing Racism in US

    by Alan J. Singer

    The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) called out American health disparities, police abuse and crackdowns on protesters as key failures of the United States to address racial inequality. 


  • "Pour Myself a Cup of Ambition": The 1970s Echo in Today's Union Revival

    by Ellen Cassedy and Lane Windham

    This Labor Day, we’re hopeful about the renewed energy and excitement for workplace organizing—especially by women workers—and cautiously optimistic that today’s workers may overcome the sorts of corporate tactics that blocked organizing in the 1970s.


  • Uncancel Wilma Soss

    by Robert E. Wright and Janice Traflet

    Wilma Soss defied norms as a woman who became independently wealthy through her PR agency and her investments, but the circumstances of her marriage and her outspoken advocacy for shareholders against corporate waste led to her erasure.  Her biographers hope to correct that. 


  • The Chicano Moratorium in East LA and Ventura County

    by Frank P. Barajas

    Chicano Moratorium commemorations continue today in communities in and out of East Los Angeles as they mark a history that centers on the experience of ethnic Mexican and Latinx peoples in the US to inspire and reinspire the young and old, to continue their struggle to realize the ideal of justice for all.


  • What Elizabeth Johnson’s Exoneration Teaches about the Salem Witch Hunt

    by Tony Fels

    The Massachusetts legislature recently exonerated Elizabeth Johnson, though her confession and conviction shows how "members of the Puritan communities of early Massachusetts could readily convince themselves that in some way or other, perhaps at a moment of weakness, they really had allowed Satan into their lives."


  • The Reputation of Presidents Takes a Hit in Their Second Term

    by Ronald L. Feinman

    The 2024 presidential campaign is fast approaching, with speculation rampant about whether Biden should seek a second term. Although his political fortunes have improved recently, the record of second-term presidents might give him pause.