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medical history



  • Nobody Has My Condition But Me

    by Beverly Gage

    Presenting with unusual autoimmune symptoms tied to a thus-far unique genetic mutation placed a reseacher and biographer on the other side of being studied. 



  • John Fetterman and the Politics of Disability

    by Anya Jabour

    The personal became political for a historian who experienced disability similar to that affecting the new Pennsylvania senator on the campaign trail. The media must significantly readjust its framing of how disability impacts the ability to perform work. 



  • A Medical Historian Confronts Her Own Diagnosis

    by Lindsey Fitzharris

    "The experience has got me thinking about the women who came before me and how their pain and suffering accelerated medical advancements from which I am benefiting."


  • Transgender Youth Have Doubters. They Also Have History

    by Pax Attridge

    Opponents of gender-affirming medical intervention for trans youth invoke "transtrendiness" or social influence to claim that they're protecting youth from impulsively making medical decisions based on peer pressure. To accept this belief is to ignore the historical presence of transgender youth. 



  • Doctors Who? The Radical History of DIY Transition

    by Jules Gill-Peterson

    As trans people's access to the medical system is under attack by law and political rhetoric, it may be necessary to revisit the history of trans women taking their gender transitions into their own hands. 



  • "Phantom Catholic Threats" Haunt Ireland's National Maternity Hospital

    by Máiréad Enright

    Secular Irish health advocates fear that a partnership between the state and religious charities to operate the national maternity hospital will impose limits on care, including abortion access. Is this justified or a case of finding "nuns under the bed"? 


  • Healing a Divided Nation

    by Carole Adrienne

    From specialized trauma care to emergency transportation to board certification of physicians, when we encounter the medical system today, we are experiencing Civil War medicine. 



  • Intimacy at a Distance: A New Book on Teletherapy Reviewed

    by Danielle Carr

    Hannah Zeavin's book traces the roots of the contemporary surge in mental health apps and pandemic-driven teletherapy, arguing that psychiatry has always relied on a fantasy of unmediated communion between two separate people that doesn't hold up to scrutiny.