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journalism


  • A Passport Tells a Story of a Bygone Time

    by Ron Steinman

    The author's passport, with its pages added to accommodate the visas accrued through decades of foreign journalism, reflects an era of travel that might never return from the twin threats of COVID and the decline of international trust in the United States. 



  • The Discursive Power of the Pittsburgh Courier and the Black Press

    by Adam Lee Cilli

    The influential Black newspaper's publisher Robert L. Vann has been criticized as a self-promoting tribune of the Black bourgeoisie. A historian argues he should be reconsidered as a pragmatist building alliances in a time of upheaval for Black America. 



  • Selling the Story of Disinformation

    Today's concern with "disinformation" has roots in the postwar advertising industry, but do programs to fight it repeat faulty ideas about information and persuasion that admen created to persuade companies their ads would work? 



  • A Black Reporter Exposed Official Lies about the Atomic Bomb

    Charles Loeb's reporting defied the official government line that radiation from the atomic bombs dropped on Japan was harmless, and resonated with Black readers who suspected a racist motive in dropping the new weapons on Japanese cities. 



  • How the George Floyd Uprising Was Framed for White Eyes

    Some of the most iconic news photographs of the Civil Rights Movement told a particular story to white liberals – that Black protesters were passive victims needing their help, instead of actively fighting for freedom. Those photos today help define the mainstream limits of "acceptable" protest. 



  • On the Life and Legacy of Black Journalist Louis Lomax (Review)

    by Joshua Clark Davis

    Louis Lomax was a provocateur, and was comfortable writing critically about both moderate and militant participants in the Black freedom movement; Thomas Aiello's new biography examines the complicated figure in African American journalism. 



  • On Popular History: Rebecca Traister

    by Alexis Coe

    Historian Alexis Coe interviews writer and essayist Rebecca Traister on the historical research informing her work and the links between popular and academic audiences for historical knowledge. 



  • Elegy for Op-Ed

    by Michael J. Socolow

    The decision by the Times to rebrand its outside commentaries reflects its failure to fight consistently over the years for the open exchange of ideas and to differentiate the views it published from its own official positions.