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journalism



  • The Debate Renews: Show Images Victims of Mass Killings in the Press?

    by Jelani Cobb

    Mamie Till's decision to place her son's open casket in the national media shone a light on Jim Crow atrocities, but it's unclear that showing the victims of gun massacres – even children – is making any difference. Photos of hundreds of lynching victims only encouraged their killers.



  • Why are Historians at War with the New York Times?

    Politico's media columnist argues that the paper's outsize role in the culture is driving the anger of historians whose uncredited work was foundational to the paper's recent series on Haiti's debt payments to France. 



  • What's New and Not in the NYT Haiti Blockbuster

    by Jonathan M. Katz

    What can be taken away from the battle erupting between journalists and historians over the Times's blockbuster news event on Haiti's post-independence forced ransom? 



  • Nicole Hemmer Reviews Martin and Burns's "This Will Not Pass"

    by Nicole Hemmer

    The book by two political reporters portrays the dire contrast between a Republican Party willing to do anything to hold power between November 2020 and January 2021 and a Democratic Party enmeshed in business-as-usual. 



  • War as a Spectator Event

    by Nicole Hemmer

    It's necessary to consider the ethics and morality of consuming warfare as a spectator event, and to temper emotional reactions spurred by images of suffering with understanding of their context. 



  • The Black Press is a Model for How to Cover Racism in the News

    by Olivia Paschal

    The mainstream press worked to obscure the nature and extent of racist violence in the early 20th century; Black journalists and Black-owned newspapers did the essential work of preserving the truth and explaining the context of white supremacist terrorism. 



  • The Four Secrets to Success for "Gonzo Journalism"

    by Peter Richardson

    Hunter S. Thompson's emergence as a major media figure came from the convergence of the souring of John F. Kennedy-style liberalism and collaborations with fellows like illustrator Ralph Steadman who launched HST's interpretive and visceral style as a critique of the Nixon years.