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history wars


  • What's Driving the Latest Texas History Wars?

    by John Willingham

    An organized and well-funded alliance of charter schools and conservative activists is leveraging the Critical Race Theory controversy in Texas to pursue the real prize: school education funding. 


  • Lessons from the History Textbook Wars of the 1920s

    by Bruce W. Dearstyne

    Historians helped defuse a national tempest over allegedly unpatriotic textbooks in the 1920s by explaining the nature of professional historical research, interpretation, and dissemination, and insisting on the right and duty of professionals to exert expertise. That kind of work is needed again today. 


  • Historians Can't Leave the Teaching of History to Politicians

    by Walter G. Moss

    As a historian of Russia, the author finds today's political interference with history teaching "like Soviet authorities forbidding Soviet history teachers to mention Trotsky’s role in bringing the 1917 communist revolution about."



  • Texas Senate Declares War on History

    by Julian Zelizer

    "Though much of the debate is being framed as being about "Critical Race Theory" -- a term that is politically useful since most Americans have no idea what it means -- it's really about teaching the history of race relations and civil rights."



  • To Understand the History Wars, Follow the Paper Trail

    by James Grossman and Jeremy C. Young

    "This is the legislative equivalent of push-polling — creating division where none exists, raising fears about something that isn’t even happening to score political points."



  • What the 1619 Project Really Means

    by Timothy Messer-Kruse

    Professor Timothy Messer-Kruse argues that critics from both ends of the political spectrum have misunderstood the project.


  • Re-Animating the 1619 Project: Teachable Moments Not Turf Wars

    by James Brewer Stewart

    Those of us who value the 1619 Project can reclaim our “teachable moment” by excavating beneath the heated rhetoric. There we will discover that the journalists and the historians embrace conflicting but equally valuable historical truths regarding slavery’s power to shape our nations past and present.



  • 1619 and All That

    by Alex Lichtenstein

    "What is odd about the letter is that it implies that the singular problem with the 1619 Project is that journalists are practicing history without a license."


  • 1,056 Feet: Why I Needed the 1619 Project Growing Up

    by Derek Litvak

    The 1619 Project is not interested in retelling America’s founding story. It seeks to forge a new one. The people who contributed to this effort know full well those like myself, who grew up in the drainage ditches of America, in the long shadow of a bright star, need to hear this history. Demands to “stick to the facts” often sideline or silence our story. 



  • A Matter of Facts

    by Sean Wilentz

    The New York Times’ 1619 Project launched with the best of intentions, but has been undermined by some of its claims.


  • Poles Apart: Putin, Poland and the Nazi-Soviet Pact

    by Geoffrey Roberts

    As the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II approaches, two of that war’s main victims – Poland and Russia – are once again embroiled in a highly emotional dispute about its origins. At the heart of the matter is the perennial controversy about the Nazi-Soviet pact of 23 August 1939.