;

voting rights



  • Black Women’s Long Struggle for Voting Rights

    "As historian Faye E. Dudden writes in 'Fighting Change,' her book on the suffrage movement in the Reconstruction period, Stanton dipped her pen into a tincture of white racism and sketched a reference to a nightmarish figure, the black rapist'.”



  • Dropping ‘Pettus’ Is a Bridge Too Far

    by Jonathan Zimmerman

    Advocates of renaming the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma for John Lewis are disregarding Lewis's published thoughts on the subject. 



  • Why John Lewis Matters—Now More Than Ever

    The book and the documentary Good Trouble serve as twin cultural epitaphs for a man widely adored and perpetually being reimagined, discovered, and studied.



  • Remembering John Lewis

    by Nicolaus Mills

    How long Lewis expected America to take before it woke up he did not say, but as he showed both in the 1960s and in a political career as a Georgia Congressman that began in 1987 and lasted until his death, Lewis did not tire when change did not go as he wanted.



  • The World John Lewis Helped Create

    Black leaders pause to reflect on the civil-rights icon and representative from Georgia, who spent decades calling for activism and “good trouble.”



  • It Takes a Long Time to Vote

    by Jonathan Coopersmith

    No federal law governs wait times. Nearly two-thirds of voters in 2012 and three-quarters in 2018 waited less than 10 minutes. But long wait times are a chronic problem primarily for Latino and Black voters in “precincts with high minority populations, high population, and low incomes.”



  • A 1960s Lawsuit Against the KKK Can Help Protect Elections in 2020

    The precedent means that election authorities have a positive obligation to alleviate conditions that could make voters afraid to cast a ballot. In the 1960s, that meant the Klan. Under COVID, it could mean crowded polls, long lines, or the lack of means to vote by mail.