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Native American history



  • Canada is Going through its Own History Wars

    by Ian Rocksborough-Smith

    "To what degree will well-established professional historians and scholars respond and engage with younger generations of activists, intellectuals and cultural workers adamant about centring the experiences of marginalized people?"



  • Traumatic Monologues: The Therapeutic Turn in Indigenous Politics

    by Melanie K. Yazzie

    American and Canadian politicians are happy to promote initiatives based in psychological understandings that "trauma" is the principal source of Native disadvantage, while ignoring the ongoing colonial exploitation of indigenous lands by the oil and gas industries.



  • Few Remember the Worst Slaughter of Native Americans in US History

    The Army killed about 350 members of the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone in present-day Idaho 1863. Racism against natives, the banality of such attacks, and the mass carnage of the Civil War overshadowed the massacre; the efforts of Shoshone have ensured it was not forgotten.



  • California Ski Resort to Change Racist, Sexist Name

    "In modern usage, the word "squaw" is considered to be "offensive, derogatory, racist, and misogynistic," the resort, formerly known as Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, said as it explained its reasoning."



  • Why Do Native People Disappear From Textbooks After the 1890s?

    by Joshua Ward Jeffery

    Failure to teach the ongoing history of Native people in the US validates the credo of the Carlisle Industrial School and other Indian residential schools to "kill the Indian, and save the man," perpetuating a view that consigns Natives to the past and erases them from the present. 



  • The US is Not a "Nation of Immigrants" (Excerpt)

    by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

    Celebrations of multiculturalism obscure the country’s settler colonial history—and the role that immigrants play in perpetuating it, argues Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz in a new book excerpted here.



  • The Hiawatha Asylum: The Threat Behind Indian Boarding Schools

    “People vanished out of boarding schools; people went to jail and didn’t come back. People didn’t know where their relatives were, so it’s still a shock. It’s like finding out you had somebody in your family who was in a concentration camp."