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foreign policy



  • The Legacy of 9/11

    by Stephen Wertheim

    "9/11 might well have 'changed everything' as momentously as was assumed—just not in the direction intended."



  • Social Security Versus National Security

    by Rebecca Gordon

    The military budget has quietly displaced Social Security as the "third rail" of American politics, and it's increasingly clear that the welfare of the defense industry will take priority over the welfare of Americans. 



  • Republicans are Far More Radical than Democrats on Israel

    by Max Boot

    Post columnist Max Boot surveys the bipartisan field of US policy toward Israel and concludes that the absolute support for the Israeli right from the Republicans, driven by the importance of evangelical voters, is wholly unprecedented. 



  • Open Letter in Support of Free Inquiry and Discussion

    A group of interdisciplinary scholars and foreign policy practitioners argue that a recent prospective appointee to the National Security Council has been treated unfairly for challenging a hardline national security consensus in regard to Russia. 



  • What Kind of Fear Is Stopping Joe Biden?

    by Samuel Moyn

    The course of the Biden administration's policy agenda will be determined by what Democrats are afraid of. In particular, it will matter whether they are more afraid of foreign adversaries or of domestic poverty. 



  • Necessary but Not Sufficient

    by Daniel Bessner

    The 2001 AUMF in effect has become yet another tool to enable the United States to prosecute a series of endless wars in the Global South.



  • Biden Just Made a Historic Break With the Logic of Forever War

    by Stephen Wertheim

    A historian of American interventionism says that Joe Biden's apparent determination to withdraw from Afghanistan is a significant break from recent precedents, and possibly signals a shift away from perpetual war. 



  • The Long History of Members of Congress Talking Directly with U.S. Adversaries

    by Richard A. Moss and Sergey Radchenko

    New documents demonstrate that Senator Ted Kennedy had back-channel contact with the Brezhnev regime in the 1970s, which aimed both at resolving sticky diplomatic issues and at elevating Kennedy above Democratic party rivals. It's unclear if Kennedy was acting with or undercutting American intelligence agencies. 



  • Is America’s Longest Forever War Really Coming To An End?

    by Adam Weinstein and Stephen Wertheim

    The authors argue that Joe Biden has recognized that the US faces the choice of absolute withdrawal from Afghanistan or permanent entanglement. His resolve will be tested by inevitable bad news, but the time is now to move on from the policy of perpetual war. 



  • Biden’s Plan for Central America Is a Smokescreen

    by Aviva Chomsky

    The Biden plan for Central America revives the Cold War formula of business-friendly economic development and militarized security in the name of stopping migration toward the US. This, the author argues, amounts to doubling down on failed policies that have driven migration for decades.



  • Does Biden Really Want to End the Forever Wars?

    by Jack Goldsmith and Samuel Moyn

    Recent presidents, including Joe Biden, have relied on an expansive view of presidential powers under Article II of the Constitution to conduct military action outside of the framework of declared war.