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espionage



  • The Man Who Conned the Confederacy

    Samuel Upham's trade in counterfeit Confederate bills started to cash in on the craze for war souvenirs. It's possible that the U.S. Government helped him improve his operation to destabilize the Confederate currency. 



  • Review: How Espionage Has Helped Win Wars

    A roundup of new books in the history of espionage covers Asian Americans in the WWII OSS, the early Cold War, and an examination of the roots of Putin's aggressiveness against dissidents.



  • The Ritchie Boys

    Stories from members of the Ritchie Boys, a secret U.S. WWII intelligence unit bolstered by German-born Jews.



  • The Spy Who Came in from the Carrel

    Two new books by Kathy Peiss and Richard Ovenden deal with the question of acquiring or destroying knowledege as an act of war, including the work of archivists in the OSS's "Chairborne Division" and the forced labor of Jewish scholars to identify major works of Judaica for Nazi Germany to purge. 


  • The Audacious Escape of George Blake

    by Steve Vogel

    George Blake was the most notorious double agent in Cold War Britain, which makes the story of his amateurish (but successful) escape from prison all the more remarkable. 



  • Jonathan Pollard: Revisiting a Still Sensitive Case

    The National Security Archive is republishing its trove of declassified documents related to Jonathan Pollard, a US Navy analyst convicted of spying for Israel in the 1980s. Pollard's parole recently ended. 


  • These Are the Guys Who Invented Modern Espionage

    by Giles Milton

    The Secret Intelligence Service (today’s MI6) had been established in 1909, but it was to come into its own in the aftermath of the 1917 Russian Revolution that swept Lenin’s Bolsheviks to power.



  • Ron Radosh: The Nation’s Continuing Denial of Soviet Espionage during the New Deal Years

    Harry Dexter White, the assistant secretary of the Treasury and the man who created the postwar financial structure and the International Monetary Fund, was arguably the top Communist spy working in our top government agencies during the New and Fair Deal days. As I argued in these pages a while back, economist Benn Steil’s new research not only revealed that White was a Soviet agent, but also brings to the mainstream what many of us have known for years — that the New Deal administration was heavily penetrated by Soviet spies, many of them American citizens who were working for Stalin’s intelligence agencies.