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military history



  • A Hitler-Style Seizure of Power Was Never in Trump's Reach

    by Waitman Wade Beorn

    A historian of the German military under Nazism argues that Trump lacked the ability to recruit the military to his side the way that Hitler did, and the US faces greater danger from extremist paramilitaries or civil attempts to subvert democracy than from a military coup.


  • The Legacy of Same-Sex Love in Ancient Thebes

    by James Romm

    The story of the Sacred Band of Thebes – a fighting force of pairs of male lovers – was discovered in time to provide inspiration to gay rights struggles from the Victorian era to the present. James Romm's new book tells the story. 



  • Missile Defense is Not a Substitute for Arms Control

    by John Tierney and Samuel M. Hickey

    A former Congressman and an arms control analyst argue that the key goal of upcoming meetings between Biden and Putin is nuclear arms control; the United States can afford to use its technological superiority in missile defense as a chip to ensure this greater goal. 



  • Deep-Rooted Racism, Discrimination Permeate US Military

    Since desegregating after World War II, the military has cultivated an image of meritocracy. Personnel have always charged that that image masks discrimination and a climate of hostility to servicemembers of color. Military justice procedures make measuring the problem difficult. 


  • Preserving the Stories of the Second World War

    by Colin Heaton

    Colin Heaton's latest book of oral history (with Anne-Marie Lewis) is based on oral histories he conducted with five significant Allied Airmen from World War II. Here, he discusses his work collecting veterans' stories from all sides of the airborne war and why those stories matter. 



  • Narrative Napalm: Malcolm Gladwell's Apologia for American Butchery

    by Noah Kulwin

    Reviewer Noah Kulwin argues Malcolm Gladwell's book on the rise of American air power misrepresents the military history of World War II, wrongly elevates Curtis LeMay to the status of a heroic genius, and blithely passes over the vast carnage of incendiary and atomic bombings. 



  • How the Pentagon Started Taking U.F.O.s Seriously

    In 2017, the New York Times revealed that the Pentagon had been conducting a secret research program on UFOs for ten years, upending more than a half-century of conspiratorial thinking about what the government was allegedly hiding. 



  • Tribes Want Medals Awarded for Wounded Knee Massacre Rescinded

    "To date, the nation has awarded more than 3,500 Medals of Honor, including about 400 to soldiers who fought during campaigns against Native Americans.... no medals awarded for service in the Indian campaigns have been revoked."