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democracy



  • How Did the Senate Get Supermajority Gridlock?

    by Lindsay M. Chervinsky

    The framers clearly intended for majority rule in the passage of legislation in the Senate. So how did we get to the point where a majority can't do anything? 



  • Too Often, Politicians Pick Their Voters

    by Warren E. Milteer Jr.

    Political factions and then organized parties have fought over the size, composition and geographical ordering of the electorate since the founding. This legacy today undermines the legitimacy of government and the political will to protect the right to vote. 


  • Teaching "All Men are Created Equal" (Part II)

    by Jeff Schneider

    In the second part of this essay, a longtime teacher of American history maintains that a close reading of the Declaration of Independence makes it possible to discuss revolution and racism in a thoughtful way without intimidating either white students or students of color.



  • Review Essay: Freedom for Whom?

    by Michael Mirer

    Two recent books, by Tyler Stovall and Annelien De Dijn, interrogate the history of the idea of freedom and the question of whether western liberal democracy can be freed from its historical roots in exclusion and domination of others. 



  • Why Let the Supreme Court Dominate Democracy?

    by Nikolas Bowie

    Liberals have been conditioned to look to the Supreme Court of Brown v. Board of Education as a protector of democracy. What if the court's dominant historical legacy is the body of decisions that enabled the rise of Jim Crow in the first place? 



  • There’s Less Than Two Years to Save American Democracy

    Voting Rights scholar Ari Berman discusses the past, present, and future of the ballot, and the parallels between the overthrow of Reconstruction-era voting rights and today's proposals to empower state legislatures and suppress the vote. 



  • Save Democracy: Abolish the Senate

    by Michael Tomasky

    Great Britain made the wise choice of diminishing the political power of the House of Lords. The New Republic's editor says that the history of Parliament and Congress shows it's time to do the same to the Senate. 



  • Our 250-Year Fight for Multiracial Democracy

    The 1829 Virginia Constitutional Convention offers a lens onto the profoundly anti-democratic views held by many of the founding generation. We deal with the same hostility toward majority rule today. 



  • House Arrest: How An Automated Algorithm Constrained Congress for a Century

    In 1929, Congress adopted a formula for apportionment based on the Census. While made political disputes a matter of law, it also capped the size of the House, which has not kept up with population growth and contributed to the disproportionate influence of small states in the House and the Electoral College.



  • The Man Who Waited 50 Years for This Moment

    Fred Wertheimer has been battling the influence of money in politics since the 1970s. Writer George Packer asks if, at age 82, he will finally match his ideas to the political moment. 



  • Will Hong Kong’s Free Press Survive?

    Security laws imposed by Beijing suggest that the Chinese government has lost patience for Hong Kong's traditionally active and frequently antagonistic press.