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  • Originally published 09/24/2013

    Cliodynamics?

    Could a new data-driven theory of history be truly transformative?

  • Originally published 09/24/2013

    I found real Abraham Lincoln!

    ‘Armchair historian’ disputes 2007 claim, says he’s found the actual 16th President in famed Gettysburg Address photo

  • Originally published 06/13/2013

    "Being a Professor Will No Longer Be a Viable Career."

    Cary Nelson at Yale in 2007. Credit: Wiki Commons.The academic freedom of professors is under siege, Cary Nelson, former president of the American Association of University Professors said during his opening remarks for that organization's annual meeting in Washington D.C. yesterday. Universities are threatening to hijack the intellectual property rights of faculty members over their course material, he argued, and the consequences of that could be extreme.“If we lose this battle for intellectual property,” Nelson said, “it's over. Being a professor will no longer be a viable career. It will be a service industry. That's it.”Nelson said that the advent of massive online open courses – commonly referred to as MOOCs – offer the potential for tremendous disruption not just in terms of jobs and educational options for students, but professors' control over their course content.

  • Originally published 06/27/2014

    Surowiecki on Intellectual Piracy 

    James Surowiecki had an excellent article in the June 9 issue of the New Yorker about countries committing intellectual piracy. It includes a nice summary of how "stealing" patented ideas played a major role in the early economic development of the United States. In the process, it surveys some of the considerable historical evidence debunking the widespread myth that intellectual property is necessary for, or even makes a contribution to, economic growth.

  • Originally published 06/27/2014

    Surowiecki on Intellectual Piracy 

    James Surowiecki had an excellent articlein the June 9 issue of the New Yorker about countries committing intellectual piracy. It includes a nice summary of how "stealing" patented ideas played a major role in the early economic development of the United States. In the process, it surveys some of the considerable historical evidence debunking the widespread myth that intellectual property is necessary for, or even makes a contribution to, economic growth.

  • Originally published 06/27/2014

    Surowiecki on Intellectual Piracy 

    James Surowiecki had an excellent articlein the June 9 issue of the New Yorker about countries committing intellectual piracy. It includes a nice summary of how "stealing" patented ideas played a major role in the early economic development of the United States. In the process, it surveys some of the considerable historical evidence debunking the widespread myth that intellectual property is necessary for, or even makes a contribution to, economic growth.

  • Originally published 06/27/2014

    Surowiecki on Intellectual Piracy 

    James Surowiecki had an excellent article in the June 9 issue of the New Yorker about countries committing intellectual piracy. It includes a nice summary of how "stealing" patented ideas played a major role in the early economic development of the United States. In the process, it surveys some of the considerable historical evidence debunking the widespread myth that intellectual property is necessary for, or even makes a contribution to, economic growth.

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