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baseball


  • 6 Great World Series!

    by Mark Weisenmiller

    For over one hundred years, major league baseball’s World Series has both thrilled fans and reflected historical and societal changes in the United States.



  • Baseball’s Cooperstown Myth

    by Christopher Klein

    In reality the shrine to baseball’s gods was built on top of an elaborate creation myth.



  • The National Pastime, Amid a National Crisis

    by Michael Beschloss

    By combining the Civil War and baseball, Moore’s photograph merges two of the most important elements of the American historical experience, both of which, to this day, have deep emotional resonance.



  • Ron Briley: Review of "Beyond Home Plate: Jackie Robinson on Life After Baseball," edited by Michael Long

    The courage and athletic ability demonstrated by Jackie Robinson in breaking Major League Baseball’s color line in 1947 and making the Brooklyn Dodgers a dominant National League club during the 1950s resulted in the ballplayer’s induction into the pantheon of baseball immortals at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. Robinson’s career after he retired from the sport following the 1956 season is, however, less well known, but Robinson’s decision to take an active role in the civil rights movement provides ample proof that the courage displayed on the playing field carried over into the struggle for a democratic nation freed from the scourge of racial discrimination and segregation.