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News Abroad


  • Not All Roads Lead to Kashmir

    by Andrew Howard

    A recent tragedy on a historically contentious railway route shows that decisions about infrastructure development are made with symbolic and emotional considerations as well as pragmatic ones.


  • On Putin's Vacant Moral Imagination

    by Walter G. Moss

    Russia's stances toward Ukraine and the west in general reflect its leaders' inability, perhaps nurtured by the Soviet system, to view world affairs through another's perspective. 


  • Why Should War Criminals Operate with Impunity?

    by Lawrence Wittner

    When major military powers like Russia, China and the United States withhold participation in the International Criminal Court, it allows war criminals to do as they please. Leading a more stable international order means joining fully with the ICC. 


  • The Wagner Group is Just the Latest Example of Privatized War

    by Lawrence Wittner

    Hiring soldiers of fortune to wage war has long been profitable to mercenaries and politically advantageous to rulers. Its modern resurgence with the American Blackwater organization and the Russian Wagner Group show the need for stronger cooperative security to prevent human rights abuse.


  • Is Biden Prepared to Adopt a Truly Progressive Foreign Policy?

    by Leon Fink

    Protecting the so-called Liberal World Order these days puts great emphasis on preserving “order” but very little on what “liberal” can or should mean. The administration risks fumbling an opportunity to connect with new foreign leadership on labor, environment, immigration, and other issues beyond security and the drug war.


  • The Rising "Pink Tide" in Latin America Shows the Need for US Policy to Adapt

    by Aileen T. Teague

    Colombia has historically been a conservative firewall in Latin America, anchoring American policy on the hemispheric drug war and development policy. The election of that nation's first leftist leader, along with the rise of Chinese influence, signals the need for American policy to change. 


  • The Dangerous Trend of Imperial Nostalgia – It's not Just Russia

    by Lawrence Wittner

    The embrace of the belief that nations are entitled to reclaim their past dominance underlies Russia's invasion of Ukraine but also is influencing the politics of Britain, France, China, and the United States. A renewed commitment to international cooperation is needed to thwart this dangerous turn. 


  • How Will History Remember Xi?

    by Robert Brent Toplin

    Despite China's growth as an economic and military force, Xi Jinping's authoritarian government may ultimately be seen as a drag on the nation's prosperity and the flourishing of the Chinese population. 


  • Democracy's Enemies are Abroad, but Also at Home

    by Jim Sleeper

    If neoconservative warnings of a coming global struggle between Russia and "the West" are right, the west must consider what changes it is willing to make to allow for a victory without planetery catastrophe. 


  • When Will the French Dam Against the Far Right Crack?

    by Brian Sandberg

    Macron is the latest representative of the French center to call for an electoral coalition to act as a "dam" against the far right. In another French presidential election, the dam has held, but will it endure?