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News Abroad


  • It's Time for a "Don't Trust, Do Verify" US-Russia Cybersecurity Treaty

    by Glenn C. Altschuler and Justin Lifflander

    The Reagan-Gorbachev summit meetings that yielded the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty and established mutual weapons monitoring weren't expected to succeed, but offer hope that negotiations between Biden and Putin could advance progress toward needed mutual cybersecurity action. 


  • A Celebrity Apology and the Reality of Taiwan

    by Evan Dawley

    Actor John Cena's blunder into the Taiwan-China controversy should be an opportunity for Americans to learn more about the history of this conflict and of an independent Taiwanese identity that has been shaped by Japanese colonization, Chinese nationalism, war, and the Communist revolution. 


  • Jerusalem: A Divided and Invented City

    by James A.S. Sunderland

    Both Hamas and the Israeli right base their claims to Jerusalem on understandings of the city as shaped by the orientalist and segregationist values of British governors during the Mandate period, and not on the city's longer heterogenous and multicultural history. Peace activists look to that history as an example of coexistence. 


  • The Rebuilt Berlin Palace Embodies the Tensions of the City's History and Future

    by Barney White-Spunner

    While Berliners have incorporated the city's notorious wall into museums and public art, restoring the site of the Berliner Schloss of the Hohenzollerns and then the Palast der Republic of the East German government has been much more contentious. The Humboldt Forum has been criticized, but its design and reception exemplify the tensions inherent in democracy.


  • Reflections on Russia's "Victory Day"

    by Nadya Williams

    Russia's observance of Victory Day prompts reflection on the ways Holocaust survivors and their descendants lived lives shaped by this trauma. 


  • Aidez Madrid!

    by Andy Robinson

    The embrace of the far-right Vox party by Madrid's conservative coalition promises to drive the region's politics toward nativism, climate denialism, and reckless COVID policies. 


  • Making Religious Peace in Afghanistan

    by Wayne Te Brake

    American policymakers must recognize the distinctly religious components of the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan, and learn from European wars of religion: the key to ending war is brokering a political agreement that protects religious diversity. 


  • Can Abolition of Nuclear Weapons Overcome the Opposition?

    by Lawrence Wittner

    People who want to end the nightmare of nuclear destruction that has haunted the world since 1945 should consider widening the popular appeal of nuclear weapons abolition by strengthening the UN’s ability to provide international security.


  • The Return of Human Rights on the American Agenda?

    by Richard Moe

    One of Jimmy Carter's legacies, albeit erratically observed, has been the assertion of human rights as a foreign policy priority. After four years of ignoring the issue, will the US under Joe Biden reclaim leadership in high-stakes relationships with Russia and Saudi Arabia? 


  • How Abraham Lincoln Can Inspire Peace for Yemen

    by William Lambers

    The postwar "friendship train" campaign involved Americans personally in delivering food to the hungry in Europe, and symbolized the nation's larger commitment to the Marshall Plan. A similar broad effort could help advance the policies needed to end the humanitarian crisis of war and starvation in Yemen.