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Mexican American history



  • Monica Muñoz Martinez on the Border, Violence, and Uvalde

    Michelle Garcia, journalist, essayist, Soros Equality Fellow and Dobie Paisano writer-in-residence, and Monica Muñoz Martinez, associate professor of history at the University of Texas-Austin, talk about the border security apparatus at Uvalde, and the history of violence and discrimination at the South Texas and Mexican border.


  • The Issue of Visibility in Latino Art

    by Ricardo Romo

    "The moment is ripe for bringing Latino art to public spaces and public museums. The number of talented Latino artists has multiplied over the past two decades, and the opportunity to make their work visible is now."



  • Planning For The People Y Qué? From Advocacy Planners To Hardcore Punks

    by Mike Amezcua

    "Punk fliers are planning documents. Not the official kind produced by city planning departments, of course, nor the grassroots plans by neighborhood activists resisting investment capital and gentrification. But these fliers contain a planning schema all the same."



  • View the Pioneering 1971 TV Series "Chicano" Through the USC Moving Image Archive

    The Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive of the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts has made available recently preserved video of the 1971 television program "Chicano," a pioneering examination of the political, social and cultural concerns of Mexican Americans in California and the U.S. Southwest. 


  • The Border Patrol Helped Create the "Browning" of America

    The family story of historian Mireya Loza and her father Pedro illustrates an irony of militarized border enforcement: Labor migrants who once contemplated returning to Mexico or Central America were forced to stay in the US and raise American families.



  • Pancho Villa, My Grandmother, and the Revolutionary History of the Border

    by Carlos Sanchez

    Conflicting family and neighborhood stories about the life of Pancho Villa – bandit or revolutionary? – showed the author how little of the complexity of the Mexican Revolution and the experiences of ethnic Mexican people made it into his school books in El Paso. Will new Texas laws push this knowledge back into the shadows? 



  • The Violent Origin Story of Dodger Stadium

    by Ranjani Chakraborty and Melissa Hirsch

    Through interviews with several former residents of the area, Vox explores the story of their neighborhoods razed to make room for Dodger Stadium. It’s one that’s often missing from the history of Los Angeles and has created a double-edged relationship for some Dodger fans. Features commentary by historian Priscilla Leiva. 



  • How the Modern NRA Was Born at the Border

    by Sierra Pettengill and Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

    Sierra Pettengill's new short documentary "The Rifleman" connects racist violence at the US-Mexico border and the politics of influential NRA leader Harlon Carter, who for decades concealed the fact that he was convicted at age 17 of murder for shooting a Mexican youth in Laredo. She discusses that story with historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz.



  • Lives Derailed: Notes from Migration Encounters

    by Anita Isaacs and Anne Preston

    "The contributions of immigrants, and the human toll of anti-immigrant policies should take center stage as we renew our national conversation on immigration."