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Books


  • Irwin Gellman Asks: Did JFK Steal Victory in the "Campaign of the Century"?

    by Justin P. Coffey

    Irwin Gellman's latest volume in his political history of Nixon argues the 1960 election returns in Illinois and Texas were rigged for Kennedy. A reviewer finds the case is intriguing but falls short of solid proof, though it does resonate with charges of stolen elections and media favoritism that are all too familiar today. 


  • Bridget the Grocer and the First American Kennedys

    by Neal Thompson

    The history of the Irish immigrant Kennedys has long focused on its prominent men. A new book looks to JFK's grandmother Bridget Murphy Kennedy as the foundation of the family and a neglected figure for understanding immigration, urban life, and the changing of American politics.


  • The Art of Swimming (Excerpt)

    by Bill Hayes

    Unline many recognizable modern sports, for most of human history swimming was treated as a utilitarian activity (and occasionally as a pleasure), unsuited for competition or spectatorship.


  • What "Forget the Alamo" Forgets

    by James W. Russell

    "Forget the Alamo" is ultimately constrained by American unwillingness to fully deal with the reality that the US forcibly stole Texas and the southwest from Mexico.


  • Tom Standage on his Brief History of Motion

    by James Thornton Harris

    Author Tom Standage discusses his history of personal transportation, the future of private automobile ownership, and the power of technology as a driver of history.


  • The Border and the Contingent Status of Mexican Workers

    by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

    In this excerpt from her new book "Not 'A Nation of Immigrants'," Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz argues that the politics of the border and the racialization of Mexican laborers has been a longstanding and glaring exception to the American myth of welcoming immigrants. 


  • Review: Heroes of Ireland's Great Hunger

    by Alan J. Singer

    Christine Kinealy and her co-editors enlist top scholars from both sides of the Atlantic to highlight the stories of individuals and who led efforts for hunger relief against the opposition of the British government. 


  • Lafayette as "The Nation’s Guest" (1824-1825)

    by Mike Duncan

    When Lafayette returned to America in 1824, he found the new nation already torn between his beloved ideal of liberty and the entrenched institution of slavery. HNN presents an excerpt from Mike Duncan's new book "Hero of Two Worlds." 


  • Recessional: The WASP and God (excerpt)

    by Michael Knox Beran

    "We  may  enjoy  the  poetry  of  the  fair  sheepfold  without  believing  in  the shepherd himself. But when we come to the achievement of the WASPs, their public service, their standards of conduct, their faith in the possibility of regeneration, we find that it owed a good deal to their conviction that there is a shepherd."